The Magical Future

My commute to “work” is usually a 30-minute train ride to my coworking office downtown. I got a late start today, so I wanted to order my lunch to be ready when I got downtown so I could eat and then get town to business.

I downloaded the Panera Bread app from the App Store since Apple was marketing it as something that works with the new Apple Pay feature on the iPhone 6. Panera’s app shows all the nutritional information for each of their menu items and offers to store them in HealthKit. A first for a third-party restaurant app as far as I can tell.

I scheduled a pickup time for right when I got off the train, and then paid for it using my thumbprint. All while on the train. All without having to do anything but mess with my phone.

We tend to give Apple grief when things are buggy or don’t work as well as we’d hope. It’s things like this lunch purchasing experience that are why I use and champion their products. When it works, it really works.

More of this, please.

What Problem Are You Solving?

The worst day I had in my time with Glassboard came last month. It was becoming obvious that even with the latest round of changes to the business model and pricing schemes, things weren’t turning around as well as I had hoped. I had no beliefs that new pricing would be a magic bullet to solve all of the platform’s problems, but I did think it’d be more successful converting users than it was.

In reality what happened is that rather than paying a small monthly or annual fee to continue using Glassboard as they were, more people opted to find another free alternative to move their group or business whether it be Slack, Google+ (lol really), or any of the 85,000 other alternatives on the market.

Couple this with me having a pretty big crisis with a botched migration to a new push platform, and things weren’t going really well for me. This was the point I started to think about where to take Glassboard next. Rather than keep all those discussions internal to my brain, I emailed a variety of different people ranging from friends, colleagues, users, and other business owners. This is the email I sent them:

Have come to the realization that running Glassboard in its current state is not tenable financially, mentally, or physically.

A lot of different problems with it as a product and not sure how to solve that. Mostly it feels like a niche product without a well defined audience.

Any ideas on how to figure that stuff out or where to go with it? Trying to get a bunch of different opinions, because I’m honestly not sure what to do.

Most everyone responded back, and not much of the feedback was good in the “your platform is great! Keep going!” sense. Most people were scratching their heads just as much as I was about where to take this thing next.

The best response I got fairly direct: who is the audience for your Glassboard and what problem do you solve for them?

I didn’t have a good answer for either of those questions. Shit.

Finding An Audience

If the answer to “who is your product’s audience” is “anyone with an iPhone or Android device” you are likely screwed. One of the biggest things I have learned from the entire Glassboard experience is that ‘spray and pray’ audience targeting is something that isn’t likely to work. Glassboard’s marketing message has always been fairly generic from both its time as a Sepia Labs product and under my helm. The last marketing message was “Talk to your people”, with people being a pretty generic term meaning it could work for personal or corporate communications.

There are very few collaboration products on the market that work well for both of those markets.

I spent a good amount of time over the last few weeks looking at analytics data to try to understand who was currently paying for the service and trying to analyze each of the markets that was being served by Glassboard currently. I analyzed them by three different metrics:

  • Audience size: How many potential customers are there like this group?
  • Likelihood they will pay: Do they have money AND are they willing to part with it to solve the problem?
  • Access to market: How easy is it for you to market to these people and get them to pay you for it?

My potential markets based on analytics and user interviews were families, small businesses (think Q Branch), medium-sized businesses (think OmniGroup), conferences, consumer ad hoc groups (a book club), and professional ad hoc groups (a beta test board or a cocoaheads meetup).

Analysis said I should focus my efforts towards the professional ad hoc groups and medium sized businesses because they had a large audience, were likely to pay if Glassboard could solve an actual problem for them, and there weren’t too many gatekeepers preventing me access to marketing at them.

Solving A Painful Problem

The key to selling a product to a user (whether it be a consumer, business, or enterprise) is to offer a solution to a problem they are having. If you can make that problem less painful, people are willing to pay for it. For instance, an app like OmniOutliner is successful because it’s far easier to create complex outlines in it across platforms than it is using just plain text files. TextExpander makes good money because they help power users save keystrokes by automating repeatable strings of text.

Glassboard? Well, I realized that Glassboard wasn’t really targeted at any specific group and it didn’t really solve any real sort of problem.

Here are a few different ways I tried to explain the problems Glassboard solved:

  1. It allows anyone with an iPhone or Android to communicate securely and privately.
  2. It allows users to have threaded conversations rather than IRC-style chat lines.
  3. It allows conference attendees to communicate with each other from their mobile devices.

None of these are real painful problems. You can likely name a variety of different apps that can solve #1 and #3. Threaded communications is nice, but it’s also proven to be far too niche and not really something people are willing to pay for.

I realized that Glassboard in its current form is for all intents just yet another chat platform for iOS and Android. Yeah it had an audience, but not an audience that was willing to pay for it to stay around. It didn’t solve an actual problem better than any of the free alternatives out there, so people left rather than keeping the lights on.

What Did We Learn?

What lesson can you take from my failures? Take a look at your current product and ask yourself what problem it is solving that makes it stand out from the competition. Also, ask who has that problem and if you are reaching them as well as you could.

If you are in a situation like me where you don’t have a good answer for either of those questions, you need to sit down and start answering some hard questions about where you take things next.

In my case, the risks of shifting Glassboard towards where I thought it should go next were too high for me to take on. Every business and product is different. Hopefully you learn from my mistakes and can make an excellent (and successful) product.

The Gamble

Last week I announced that Glassboard will be going out of business as of November 1, because I was unable to turn it into a profitable business. There are a lot of different things I want to cover eventually about the past year I’ve spent working on this thing. For one, it’s therapeutic to me to get it out of my head. Second, my hope is that people can learn something from my successes (yes, there were some) and failures (those too).

I knew going in that Glassboard was a moonshot. I was in essence taking over a platform that was run by six people with stable salaries from a parent company and doing it by myself, while trying to shift what turned out to be the titanic away from the iceberg.

Running any business, large or small, is mostly about managing risk. You want to invest in the things that will grow profits. Startup culture skews this in our industry, because venture capitalists are willing to assume near-term losses in favor of potential long-term riches, but for our purposes, let’s assume we are building a business like our parents made. The goal is to spend less than you are bringing in.

I am a terrible Blackjack player, but I know enough to be able to play on a few hundred bucks and have some fun. If you’re under 12, you want to take another card, because you’re really not going to hurt yourself. If you’re over 12, you’ve got to start figuring out what cards have been dealt already from the deck and determine if its worth the risk of possibly busting or not getting a high enough count to beat the dealer.

Despite being terrible at Blackjack, I play it fairly conservatively and don’t stray from those two rules too often. I try to run my businesses in the same way. Second Gear and Glassboard have always been small shops that are run with the intent of supporting me and if it grows beyond that, great.

I knew the risk of taking on Glassboard up front would be how much money it was losing each month in sunken hosting costs (not including development and design time). I projected a few different scenarios for good, great, and ‘make it rain’ levels of growth to get the business out of the red and towards profitability.

Despite cutting the monthly losses by 80% from the time I took over to today, I never fully got to that break even point and began to realize that getting there and beyond was going to require a lot more hard decisions and evaluation.

So, how do you know when you’re done and it’s time to fold? When you start thinking about shutting things down, you’re done. There may be a Hail Mary out there that could possibly save the sinking ship, but my guess is that it will only prolong the inevitable.

For me, I knew for sure last Thursday that I was done. I realized it was going to be another $60,000 or so to turn Glassboard into the product that I thought it could be eventually. There was no way I could do that emotionally, mentally, or financially. The risk was too big. I announced the next day I was cutting my losses and shutting the service down.

Glassboard was a gamble that didn’t really pay off financially (no, mom. I am not losing the house), but it was still rewarding in a lot of other ways. Hopefully those will become apparent over the next few weeks as I dump all this out of my head.

CocoaRadio Hiatus

I just published Episode 19 of CocoaRadio, my short podcast that talks technical about Mac and iOS development with various people in the community. This week I was joined by Ben Scheirman of NSScreencast to discuss how to improve the network layer code in your application.

This will be the last episode of CocoaRadio as we go on what I am calling “Fall Break”. Doing the show itself isn’t that much work. I’m lucky to have built a pretty good list of contacts in the development community who are happy to come on and do the show. I just need to schedule times, get on Skype, and chat for 30 minutes. It’s really fun!

The rest of the world around it, however, is making finding time to do a show I am proud of is much harder. I’ve realized over the last few weeks how insanely overcommitted I am right now in both my personal and professional lives, so I am working to make some changes to get some semblance of balance back. The first thing making the cut right now is the podcast, because it’s the easiest to get off the plate. There are plenty of wonderful podcasts out there, so I’m sure you can find a suitable replacement while I recharge my batteries.

I enjoy doing CocoaRadio and working with my longtime friend and producer Tony Voss on the show. We have been working together since 2008 on radio projects of all varieties. We will be back, once my plate gets a little less full. Thanks for listening.

Glassboard Shutting Down

I announced this over on the Glassboard blog, but we are shutting down. Why? I failed to turn it into a sustainable business.

I have a laundry list of things I think I got right, and things I screwed up on in this whole ordeal. I’ll write them up when I feel like I can get through it.